All tagged It Book

The Long Walk: Part One

The Long Walk may not be a great book but it’s a fascinating career choice for the emerging Richard Bachman, and a tremendous palate cleanser between King’s earliest works and the flurry of cocaine-fueled activity that would be the hallmark of his late-1970’s and 1980’s output.

Quitters, Inc.

Though he cultivated a reputation as an iconoclast and literary rebel early in his career, the success of his first three novels and the Carrie movie, meant that by 1977 King was rubbing shoulders with Hollywood royalty. HIs stories at the time reflected the change in his surroundings.

The Ledge & The Lawnmower Man

“The Ledge” and “The Lawnmower Man” are both great examples of King’s overactive imagination going off the tracks in delightfully bizarre ways. They also provide a solid shot in the arm for a short story collection that, at the mid-way point, was in danger of careening off the tracks.

Sometimes They Come Back

“Sometimes They Come Back” has a lot of things going for it: a solid protagonist, a compelling premise, and natural tension given the unreliability of the main character. But while the final outcome is less than fulfilling from a narrative standpoint, the story has interesting parallels to the modern world.

Boogeyman

Stephen King’s work doesn’t lack in terrible parents, but Lester Billings in the Night Shift short “The Boogeyman” might actually be one of the most terribly relatable.

Graveyard Shift

Stephen King is one of the most aggressively blue collar authors ever. Despite also being one of the most successful authors ever, King protects his image as a lucky bastard milltown boy with everything he can muster. Nowhere is this more present than in his short fiction, which often centers on fish out of water college educated characters in blue collar worlds. “Graveyard Shift” from the 1977 shot collection Night Shift is perhaps the quintessential example.

Jerusalem's Lot

The first short in Stephen King’s 1977 story collection Night Shift, “Jerusalem’s Lot” is a play on the formula of Dracula that takes the former novel’s dread and ramps it up to 11.

Mike Hanlon, Dick Hallorann, and Stephen King's Magical Negroes

When most of his white writer contemporaries were completely ignoring the black experience, Stephen King made several valiant attempts to include color in his novels. Black characters play major roles in The Shining, The Stand, The Talisman, and It, which, though still infrequent, far surpass many of his white contemporaries. Yet, he too often falls into the “Magical Negro” stereotype with his early black characters.

The Shining

The Shining represents a huge step forward for King, both in the level of mastery on display and in the multi-layered story. If there were fears that Carrie and ‘Salem’s Lot were flukes, The Shining put those to bed.

Rage

Over the course of 50 year career that has included killer clowns, rape, spousal abuse, and devil worship, Stephen King’s third published novel Rage is arguably is most controversial…and it wasn’t even released under his name.

'Salem's Lot

‘Salem’s Lot was Stephen King’s follow-up to 1974’s smash hit, Carrie. While it was as commercially successful as King’s debut, it shows the author stretching his wings into new psychological and thematic territory.