All in Blog Post

"No Regrets" - Short Film

A short film adaption of the short story “No Regrets” by Becky Reynolds. Written by Paul-Thomas Ferguson

Directed by Andrew Edmark. Starring Leslie Munson, Joshua Kahn, Victoria Armas, and Scott Naumann.

Produced by Two-Toms-Two Productions. To see more, visit http://www.againsttheoddsseries.com

Derry Public Radio - The Stand Pt.5 – “Deus Touches the Machina”

The circle closes as we reach the end of The Stand. Join us for this jam packed wrap up of book three as we discuss the true female hero of our story as Dayna faces off against Flagg, Ben doesn’t understand anatomy, the holiness of Trashcan Man, the domino effect of Flagg losing control over his people, the humanizing of the citizens of Vegas, the crew from Boulder finally faces off against Flagg’s men, the theological ramifications of the final confrontation, and a stunning epilogue that left us with a great question. Here’s to love, to friends, and Kung-Fu on Episode 35, “Deus Touches the Machina”.

Mike Hanlon, Dick Hallorann, and Stephen King's Magical Negroes

When most of his white writer contemporaries were completely ignoring the black experience, Stephen King made several valiant attempts to include color in his novels. Black characters play major roles in The Shining, The Stand, The Talisman, and It, which, though still infrequent, far surpass many of his white contemporaries. Yet, he too often falls into the “Magical Negro” stereotype with his early black characters.

Everybody Has An Annie Wilkes

One of the things that makes King so great is the constant what if question that we as readers are provoked by his prose to ask ourselves:What if this happened to my favorite author? Or wait, worse still — what if this were to happen to me? What if I were the prisoner?

An Education in Horror

Every horror fan has an origin story, that moment when they realize they’ve found something truly special. Mine began with Aliens, and I’ve continued my horror education throughout my life. Here are the five films that have most affected me.

Stephen Gammell's Nightmare Factory

In October of 1981, Scary Stories to Tell in the Dark was released on an unsuspecting adolescent public. Much praise has been heaped on Schwartz, and rightly so. In assembling the collection, he pulled no punches, pushing the boundaries of what was possible in a children’s book. But, Schwartz doesn’t deserve all the credit. Without a doubt, Scary Stories to Tell in the Dark has transcended all other comers to become the pinnacle of children’s horror because of the surreal, macabre pen and ink drawings of Stephen Gammell.

Exploring the Darkness

Many books have been filled with scary stories that did not go on to achieve the cult-like status of Scary Stories to Tell in the Dark. To understand the fascination with, and distrust of, the book, it is helpful to examine the era that created it.